South-South and Triangular Cooperation - Highlights from IFAD Portfolio

October 2017
South-South and Triangular Cooperation (SSTC) is a key development instrument that can contribute to achieving the objectives of the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It provides unprecedented opportunities for developing countries to leverage their own experience, knowledge and resources in support of social and economic transformation of their, and other, people.
LANGUAGES: English

Madagascar - Étude de cas L’Union et les associations d’usagers des eaux (AUE) de Migodo I

September 2017

L’accès des agriculteurs à l’eau est un facteur de développement agricole. Cet accès dépend de plusieurs facteurs, dont des facteurs économiques, politiques, ou encore environnementaux. En effet, les décisions et stratégies adoptées par le gouvernement et les autorités locales permettent à la population, et plus particulièrement aux agriculteurs, de gérer de façon durable et efficace leurs ressources hydriques.

À Madagascar, le cadre législatif du secteur de l’eau agricole a évolué à partir des années 1980. Tout d’abord, en 1990, la reconnaissance de l’importance de la préservation de l’environnement et des ressources naturelles a débouché sur une Charte de l’environnement.

LANGUAGES: French

Advancing rural women’s empowerment

September 2017

Gender equality and the empowerment of women are prerequisites for the eradication of poverty and hunger. First and foremost, gender inequalities and discrimination represent fundamental violations of the human rights of women. In addition, it is well recognized that gender inequality and discrimination undermine agricultural productivity globally,1 negatively impact children’s health and nutrition, and erode outcomes across social and economic development indicators.

Much work on rural women’s empowerment has focused on the need to expand women’s access to productive resources, which can allow them to increase their productivity. However, much more attention needs to be directed at underlying gender inequalities such as gender-biased institutions, social norms, and customs that negatively impact women’s work (paid and unpaid), livelihoods and well-being. Within food systems, these biases manifest themselves in limiting women’s access to productive resources, to services (such as finance and training), to commercial opportunities and social protection (including maternity protection). These manifestations may be regarded as symptoms, therefore, rather than drivers, of gender inequality.

 

LANGUAGES: English

Sustainable Food Value Chains for Nutrition

June 2017
To grow and lead productive lives we need good nutrition, and good nutrition starts from what we eat. Food systems have great potential to make diverse and nutritious food available and affordable to all. To do that, however, there is a need to strengthen the focus not only on how food is produced, but also how it is processed, distributed, marketed and delivered to consumers, the series of activities that together comprise a value chain (VC).
LANGUAGES: English

Sending Money Home: Contributing to the SDGs, one family at a time

June 2017
This report provides data and analysis of remittances and migration trends for developing countries over the past decade, as well as the potential contributions of remittance families to reaching the SDGs by 2030.
LANGUAGES: English

GFRID 2017 Recommendations

June 2017

Recommendations were developed through the feedback of panellists and the contribution of over 350 stakeholders at the Global Forum on Remittances, Investment and Development (United Nations Headquarters, 15-16 June 2017). 

These are presented in their draft form in the following section and will be shared with GFRID participants and the Member States consultative group. 

LANGUAGES: English

Glossary on gender issues

March 2017
This publication presents IFAD’s first glossary of terms related to gender issues.
LANGUAGES: English

Proceedings of the Third Global Meeting of the Indigenous Peoples Forum at IFAD, 10-13 February 2017

February 2017
In late 2016, regional consultation workshops in preparation for the Indigenous Peoples’ Forum were held in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Pacific, attended
by 97 representatives of indigenous peoples’ organizations and institutions. During the workshops, participants assessed the progress of implementation of
the IFAD Policy on Engagement with Indigenous Peoples and reviewed the status of implementation of the recommendations of the second global meeting and the regional action plans agreed upon with IFAD regional divisions in 2015. Participants further had the opportunity to exchange knowledge and
experiences on good practices on indigenous peoples’ economic empowerment that build on their distinctive cultures, traditional knowledge and natural resources.  
LANGUAGES: English

Guide for Practitioners on ‘Institutional arrangements for effective project management and implementation’

January 2017
The purpose of this guide is to provide some generic steps and principles to be followed when setting up institutional arrangements for the management and implementation of IFAD projects.
LANGUAGES: English

Grant Results Sheet: Tebtebba - Indigenous Peoples Assistance Facility: Asia and the Pacific

January 2017
The IFAD Indigenous Peoples Assistance Facility (IPAF) is an innovative funding resource that indigenous communities can access to support their own solutions to development challenges. It supports self-driven development by investing in small projects that build on indigenous peoples’ culture, identity, knowledge, natural resources and income-generating activities. The goal of the IPAF programme is to empower indigenous peoples’ communities and their organizations in Asia and the Pacific to foster their self- driven development. 
LANGUAGES: English

South-South and triangular cooperation: changing lives through partnership

November 2016
IFAD

South-South and triangular cooperation has an enormous potential role in agriculture and rural development in developing countries, both in unlocking diverse experiences and lessons and in providing solutions to pressing development challenges.


From the cases that follow, a number of common lessons emerge. First, it is important to create a space for interaction and cross-country learning. In the Scaling up Micro-Irrigation Systems project or with the household mentoring approach, for instance, workshops and ‘writeshops’ gathered people from diverse countries who could then share their own knowledge and experiences. In such spaces, participants could compare how a similar approach or technology required certain adaptations to better fit with local cultural, social and environmental contexts, offering important lessons for future scaling up.

Sometimes individual champions can make a difference. In Madagascar, the project design for a public/private partnership improved drastically when an IFAD consultant with similar experience in another country became involved. In this case, it was also an ‘unexpected outcome’, as the innovation came from a replacement for the regular consultant, who had broken his foot …. So even through small staff changes, knowledge of a complementary innovation from another country can have a big impact.

LANGUAGES: English

The Traditional Knowledge Advantage: Indigenous peoples’ knowledge in climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies

November 2016
Higher temperatures, wildlife extinction, rising sea levels, droughts, floods, heat-related diseases and economic losses are among the consequences of climate change. Climate change disproportionally affects the poorest and most marginalized communities living in vulnerable regions, among them indigenous peoples, whose livelihoods depend on natural resources. Nevertheless, indigenous peoples are also the world’s “advance guard” of climate change (Galloway McLean 2010). While they are generally depicted as victims of poverty and vulnerability to climate change, it would also be appropriate to emphasize their sensitivity to the environment, adaptive capacity and resilience, as manifested by their ability to modify their behaviour in response to changing climatic conditions (Nakashima et al. 2012). Indigenous peoples’ knowledge can provide important insights into the processes of observation, adaptation and mitigation of climate change consequences.

The Biodiversity Advantage: Global benefits from smallholder actions

November 2016
​Biodiversity is about more than plants, animals, and micro-organisms and their ecosystems – the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD, 1992) recognizes that it is also very much about people and our need for food security, medicines, fresh air, shelter, and a clean and healthy environment. Biodiversity is also essential for the maintenance of ecosystem-based services, such as the provision of water and food for human, animal and plant life. When we make an effort to conserve biodiversity, we are helping to maintain critical global biological resources to meet our needs today as well as those of future generations. Biodiversity conservation is therefore central to achieving recent global commitments for sustainable development under “Agenda 2030”, adopted by the United Nations in 2015. The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) recognizes that losing biodiversity means losing opportunities for coping with future challenges, such as those posed by climate change and food insecurity. 
LANGUAGES: English

The Economic Advantage: Assessing the value of climate-change actions in agriculture

November 2016
​This report is aimed at readers who seek to build economic evidence in support of the inclusion of actions on agriculture in climate change plans and programmes, particularly at the national level under the umbrella of nationally determined contributions (NDCs) to the December 2015 Paris Agreement, which aims to restrict a rise in global temperatures and manage risks. Agriculture is a sector especially sensitive to climate change. It also accounts for significant emissions and is, therefore, a priority for both adaptation and mitigation plans and actions at global, national and local levels. 
LANGUAGES: English

Policy case study - Benin: Farmers’ organizations interview presidential candidates on agricultural development

November 2016
In Benin, agriculture plays a central role in the national economy, contributing 32 per cent of GDP and employing a large part of the workforce. Despite significant productive potential and a diversified agricultural sector (crop production, livestock, non‑timber forest products, fisheries), the country relies heavily on imports of food products, which represent 25 per cent of the total value of imports.
LANGUAGES: English